Peas in the Prepper's Pantry

Freeze dried peas by Nutristore
-------------------------------------------------03/25/20
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Augason Farms Freeze Dried Peas
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Peas in the Prepper's Pantry
Stock up on Freeze dried and dehydrated peas

Put peas in the prepper's pantry!
The humble pea is a sturdy vegetable that's rich in Vitamin C and
high in dietary fiber and protein. It's a little powerhouse of
nutrition that belongs in every prepper's pantry.

From just an ounce of
freeze dried peas, like the ones from
Augason Farms pictured right, you'll get 11% of the recommended
daily dietary fiber along with 8% Vitamin A, plus 10% iron and
2% calcium. One cup of peas gives you a whopping 58 mgs of
Vitamin C, but the real surprise is that you'll get 7.9 grams, or
about 16% of your daily protein from a cup of peas. That will give
you some variety over the beans in your stockpiles.

Below are more reasons why you'll want to stockpile dehydrated
peas and freeze dried peas in your prepper's pantry...

Freeze Dried and Dehydrated Peas
Freeze dried and dehydrated peas are primal, paleo and perfect
for your food storage. The legume

Difference between freeze dried and dehydrated peas:
Should you buy freeze dried or dehydrated peas? Know the
difference between freeze dried and dehydrated peas.
One major difference is in the use of additives.

  • Freeze Dried Peas: The freeze drying process removes
    moisture, which is probably the number one reasons most
    foods spoil. The dehydrating process removes about 90-95%
    of the excess water. Freeze drying locks in important
    nutrients without comprising taste or quality. There's
    absolutely nothing added ~ no sulfur or preservatives.  
    There's no need for additives to preserve freeze dried peas
    because the freeze drying process is very efficient. They are
    quickly flash frozen at the peak of flavor, and then a vacuum
    process extracts all water. Best of all, freeze dried peas can
    store up to 25 years in proper conditions. That's because
    Augason Farms Freeze Dried Peas come in a #10 can for long
    term food storage. A little tip: let them sit longer in hot
    water and you will better enjoy the consistency.

  • Dehydrated Peas: Dehydrated peas require more time to
    reconstitute. Some dried peas require preservatives to keep
    them fresh, the exception is the green peas from Harmony
    House. Harmony House Dehydrated Peas come highly rated.
    1/3 cup of Harmony House dehydrated peas gives you 50%
    of the recommended vitamin C and have 4 grams of protein.
    The shelf-life of dehydrated products is infinite as long as
    you can isolate them from moisture and oxygen. They'll store
    easily in your preppers pantry for 1-2 years after you open
    them. They hold more of their nutritional value than their
    canned or frozen counterparts, though they'll take longer to
    reconstitute. They're not as snackable as the freeze dried
    kind only because they are a little more firm. You might find
    a few really hard ones.

Peas are a humble and hearty addition to your food storage.
Below are some ways to use freeze dried and dehydrated peas.

Add freeze-dried and dehydrated peas to you food storage:

#1: Snacking
One of the most popular ways to use freeze dried peas is for
snacking on them! Freeze dried vegetables like peas and corn
make tasty and nutritious snacks right out of the can. Snacking
on freeze dried peas is a great way to get some extra veggies
into your diet. Kids love these little green balls! They're slightly
sweet and crunchy eating them straight from the container, and
don't have that mushy texture of canned and they're much tastier
than canned peas! It's a fun toddler finger food that will start
your kids on a good eating habits.

You can eat Augason Farms freeze dried peas straight from the
can. The Freeze drying process locks in important nutrients
without comprising taste or quality ensuring you only get the best.
Be sure to have plenty of water on hand. Peas are dry and
eventually you'll want to sip on some water with your tasty snack.
They're addicting and toddlers really do crave them. You'll be
snacking on peas instead of chips.

#2: Side dish
If you have a few key freeze dried veggies on hand, you always
have a side dish. Right is a medley of Augason Farms freeze dried
green beans, diced carrots, diced potatoes, diced corn and of
course,
Augason Farms freeze dried peas.

Next to mashed potatoes, a pea side dish smothered in butter
will be delicious with whatever you hunt in an off-grid world. For
the butter, we suggest stocking
Red Feather Canned Butter.

#3: Casseroles.
Another use of peas is as part of casseroles and pastas. Freeze
dried and dehydrated peas are ideal for jar meals. They'd be
delicious in a
pasta primavera or as a way to enhance the kid's
macaroni and cheese. It's okay if the kids want their peas on the
side with butter or even served from the can as a crunchy side
dish to their mac and cheese.

Below is a tuna and noodle casserole dish that's easy to make
from food storage.
Mountain House Pasta Prima Vera
Freeze dried Celery
Harmony House Dehydrated Peas
Augason Farms Freeze Dried Peas
Harmony House Peas
Put peas in the prepper's pantry
"Plant peas in spring 6 weeks before the last frost," according to the video
above. Best of all after 3 months of growing, peas are ready to harvest!

Why Grow Peas?
Sugar Pea micro greens are robust and great for beginners. They
grow quickly, produce heavily, and regrow after being harvested
allowing for multiple cuts.

  • Dwarf Grey Sugar Peas have a high germination rate. Grey
    Sugar Pea sprouting seeds are some of the largest
    microgreen seeds and generally require a light covering of
    soil or growing medium to fully sprout. The covering should
    be less than twice the size of the seed, otherwise the
    sprouts will struggle to come to the surface.

  • These vibrant, thick green shoots with a sweet, earthy
    flavor. The seed is 100% untreated to ensure that they are
    safe to eat right out of the garden or kitchen.

  • Sprouted peas can grow in just 12 to 16 days and can be
    harvested multiple times. Sprouts are ready to harvest at
    microgreen size in about 12 to 16 days, depending on
    environmental factors. Light green stems remain fleshy and
    not woody (dry and hard), standing at about an inch and a
    half to two inches tall from the soil.

For best results growing sugar pea microgreens:
  • Evenly spread the seeds across your growing medium.
    Thoroughly pepper the seeds to fully cover the area;
    however, there should not be too much seed overlap. Two
    pinches per 4” x 4” area should be sufficient.

  • Once planted, lightly cover the seed with a light layer of
    growing medium; just enough to cover the seeds but not to
    bury them deeply.

  • Next, water the growing area with cool water and try not to
    disturb the seeds by flooding them out. This extra layer of
    medium will dampen the seed from all sides, as well as
    provide enough darkness to promote ample root
    development, aiding in even germination.

Get peas into our pantry and into your garden today!

Happy endings...
Protein packed peas, rich in fiber are worth stocking up on in your
pantry. Freeze dried peas are great paired with freeze dried corn
and carrots. Make sure to have a variety of freeze-dried
vegetables and fruits in your preppr's pantry, just in case. These
healthy foods could sustain your life in any kind of emergency
because they require no cooking at all.

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preparedness Web site of prepping, survival,
homesteading, and self-reliance.
Grow Dwarf Grey Sugar Peas
Survival Seeds
Smashed Peas Recipe from The Cook's Pantry
#12: Take Dried Peas Backpacking.
Pack a supply of freeze dried peas in a Ziplock bag and toss into
your pocket or backpack for a lightweight, mess-free, nutrition-
packed snack on the go.

#13: Feed Peas to your Pets.
Your dogs will love peas as a treat. Try adding them to the dog's
dry food. Just be sure to have plenty of fresh drinking water on
hand.

From Guinea pigs to koi fish, you can have a treat ready that you
can eat too.

#14: Peas are the perfect prepper food.
Peas fit into every diet whether you're a meat eater, vegan or
vegetarian. Plan to serve peas as part of a paleo, diabetic or
gluten free diet.

  • Peas are Paleo friendly! Are you a paleo prepper? Freeze
    dried and dehydrated peas are easy to incorporate into your
    Paleo diet.

  • Peas are perfect and gluten free. See more gluten free  
    emergency ideas.

  • Peas are for diabetics! Peas have a Glycemic Index rank of
    22 which is low. While they have carbohydrates, they also
    contain lots of fiber and protein to help slow digestion and
    this helps to stabilize blood sugar levels. Read more about
    emergency foods for diabetics.

Consider Growing peas
You may think that growing peas is an excellent idea (and it is)
but you'll need to eat peas almost as soon as picking them and
learn to dehydrate the ones you can't eat. You see, after picking
them, the sugar starts turning to starch almost immediately. This
is why freeze dried and dehydrated peas are an excellent option.
Augason Farms flash dry their peas and lock in the flavors and
nutrition.

Canadian preppers may know that Canada is the number one
exporter of dry peas in the world sold mostly to Bangladesh, India
and China. They know the value of the pea protein, fiber and
starch for soups, vermicelli and sauces. Farmers started swapping
out their wheat crops for pea crops because it was more
profitable and good for the land. That's the interesting part if
you're a prepper. Peas are good for your other crops!

Did you know it's good practice to plant peas before you plant
tomatoes or corn? That's because peas add nitrogen to help
fertilize your soil. Learn more about how to grow lots and lots of
peas from the video below...
#4: Stews.
An obvious addition to your stews are freeze dried or dehydrated
peas. Whether you make a traditional beef stew or a chicken
stew with dumplings, you'll be glad to add peas to the recipe.

#5: Stir fry.
Enhance your Asian inspired meal with freeze dried peas. SYou
can store
Harmony House peas for 1-2 years in your cupboard. No
more wasted food.

  • Fried rice. Add peas to your Asian-inspired fried rice as a
    side dish to your stir fry!

#6: Soups.
Think beyond pea soup! It's so easy to plop some freeze dried
peas into a variety soups, but if you don't cook you can add
freeze dried peas to your favorite ramen noodles to boost the
nutrition. Dehydrated peas will need a longer time to reconstitute
and have the correct texture.

#8: Pot pies.
Peas are an important part of Shepherd's pie topped with mashed
potatoes, and peas are also ideal in pot pies with carrots and
chicken.

#9: Salads.
Reconstitute freeze dried or dehydrated peas and put them into
salads ~ or use freeze dried peas as a sort of crunchy vegetable
crouton to add texture to your salads.

  • Substitute freeze dried peas for the fresh peas in this highly
    rated Bacon, Pea salad recipe from AllRecipes.com that you
    can make with food storage. To make the apocalypse
    version of this salad requires fresh or freeze dried cheddar
    cheese, fresh celery from your garden, or freeze dried celery
    and canned bacon.

#10: Rice dishes.
Whether your favorite is a risotto, a rice pilaf or a fried rice,
adding freeze dried peas to your rice dishes will add flavor and
add color to your dish.


  • Add to long grain brown rice. Your brown rice medley can
    include carrots, celery and onions in addition to the peas.

Think about using dehydrated peas beyond rice dishes and add
them to couscous and quinoa.

#11: Smashed peas and toast.
English love their "mushy peas" which is a side dish staple
equivalent to mashed potatoes. An idea beyond this is to use
smashed peas on crusty sourdough toasted and topped with
eggs. The
smashed peas recipe from The Cook's Pantry suggests
frozen peas, but easily you could make the same with freeze
dried or dehydrated peas.
Get a larder of lentils in the pantry